Micropoetry Month: Nov 2017: #27

Micropoetry MonthI’ve always wanted to try the “American Sentence” but it seemed rather intimidating. How can one sentence be a poem? Can it? If you’re new to the form, there’s a ton of information online including here.

Allen Ginsberg visualized 17 syllables in one straight line encapsulating the ‘shadow of the moment’. This is an interesting ask. Also, without the constraints of haiku, the form paints more modern images in an everyday context-observations of life as it passes, reflecting the crude, raw face of reality.

Well, I had to try it now, as we slip into the last few days of Micropoetry Month!!! Share your ‘American Sentence’ or any other form of micropoetry using comments or Mister Linky.

(1)

Taking a picture with a strange cloud, I stumble over its shadow.

(2)

How easily I reduce my day into unpunctuated texts.

(3)

See this round earth flatten itself into rectangular devices.

(4)

From Basho to Ginsberg, a thought stretches, then curls, then stretches again.

(5)

Sunday morning, the sky too wears the grey silence of a hangover.

 

25 thoughts on “Micropoetry Month: Nov 2017: #27

      1. I used the syllable count method used by Hamurrabi: every time one is distracted, you increase the count by one. The reader is expected to get distracted as many times. That way we maintain the count at all times. Quite simple actually.

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  1. I am so sorry am so far behind on the reading and commenting…will catch up for sure…those American sentences are addictive reading – your last one really the standard set, lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

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