The moon is what it is

We look for formless visions of ourselves in the
distance. But we haven’t found ourselves, not

even lost ourselves. Not yet. Between us is the
desert of halves. Is love more memorable when

it fails? More likely to last forever? I am told to
find bigger things to be grateful for: sperm,

geometry, the blue probability of a kingfisher. I
thank pain that fills fissures like wet cement so I can

wake up whole in the morning. It was happiness
that broke us when we weren’t looking. The

moon is what it is — a fiction of movement and
light. It is the sky that is unfaithful. Or the mind.

I make lists of small things, unclaimed things,
unproclaimed things: Quarter past two in the

afternoon, steamed rice, my name, uncertain,
sitting like a wingless crow upon a stranger’s lip.

 

 

In other February news, am delighted to be one of ten poets named by The Ekphrastic Review in their annual awards list. Very grateful to the editor, Lorette C. Luzajic. Do check out this brilliant platform if you read/write poetry in this genre. This award is for my poem, Corollary, which is on their site as well as in my book, Water to Water.

And if you haven’t read my first flash fiction piece yet, here’s the link. Let me know what you think. Better yet, share your flash fiction as well!

 

36 thoughts on “The moon is what it is

  1. “It was happiness that broke us when we weren’t looking…..” Sigh. Beautifully written, Rajani. Congrats on the accolade….you so deserve it!

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  2. I love coming to this place because I read, pause, reflect, continue, love & envy. As Sherry said, you so deserve the accolade.
    “moon is what it is — a fiction of movement and / light.”– Love the word ‘fiction’ here.

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  3. Wonderful words and images, and arresting ideas, as always. I especially like the last line, and those wonderfully non-sequitur lists: ‘sperm, / geometry, the blue probability of a kingfisher’; ‘Quarter past two in the / afternoon, steamed rice, my name’.

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    1. Thanks so much, Rosemary! The older version of this poem was pretty lousy.. then a few days back, in the middle of a book about tigers, I knew I had to rewrite it. The muse works in mysterious ways!

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  4. I always find poems that reference the moon alluring, and this one is particularly so, Rajani. I love the sense of searching for a soul mate, and these lines spoke to me:
    ‘…I
    thank pain that fills fissures like wet cement so I can
    wake up whole in the morning. It was happiness
    that broke us when we weren’t looking…’
    and
    ‘Quarter past two in the
    afternoon, steamed rice, my name, uncertain,
    sitting like a wingless crow upon a stranger’s lip.’
    Congratulations on the much deserved award from The Ekphrastic Review.

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  5. The crow without wings…I believe I know her name, and she knows mine. But we do not speak of the things we know. Instead, we maintain a monkish silence.

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  6. This is AWESOME!

    What a great list:
    “sperm, geometry, the blue probability”

    I adore this:
    “Quarter past two in the
    afternoon, steamed rice, my name, uncertain,
    sitting like a wingless crow upon a stranger’s lip.”

    Like

  7. A very contemplative piece: there is, indeed, a lot going on with lists (or so I’ve often thought). And, once again, congrats. You write brilliant, evocative, nuanced, incredibly imaged poetry … and it is wonderful to see you get the recognition you so richly deserve.

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  8. If the outcome of a relationship is painful, if a relationship ends, does it mean love has failed? Didn’t that love serve us? Maybe we just forget when we feel like we are halved until we remember we are whole.

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