Something else in the moonlight

Tell me your god is a poet. And not because the
universe has been crafted as a perfect sonnet. Not

because love, like an ode scribbled on a brown
paper bag on a bus that’s always going away, cares

little about grammar or meter or form. Not because
random things happen like an unexpected close, a

strange foreign word that kisses your ear, a lyrical
movement that gently erodes your resolve. But

because every day what you see is different, even
the difference is like a poem that means something

else in the moonlight, a ghazal that reveals layer
after layer with each reading, until it twists and

mocks and starts undressing all over again. Who
else would conceive a constantly renewing truth

that drags your faith to the edge? Hail the poet.
Don’t we know ‘god’ is just a blessed pseudonym?

 

Recently the papers here carried news that the Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary has added a bunch of new “Indian -English” words including hartal (a shutdown or strike), dabba (box – mostly lunch box) and shaadi (wedding). Will they find their way into poems from all over the world? We’ll wait and see!! Meanwhile, this poem came about yesterday, and as it happens with almost all of my poems, I have no idea what triggered it. Am just happy words are breaking through the fog- slowly, reluctantly, randomly – but words, nevertheless. If you’ve just written a poem, do share the link – I’d love to read it. 

37 thoughts on “Something else in the moonlight

  1. I love to read too, even though I seem to have my own style and tend not to borrow others ideas. We do howqever learn so much from opthers writing and long may it be so.

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    1. Thanks so much, Susie. That’s very kind. Am so very glad you liked this poem. I ended up writing flash fiction to break out of it… well at least it was fun trying! 🙂

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  2. A beautiful poem, as always. Some poems do come about without much effort, and I’m happy with you that you eventually emerged from the fog. 🙂 I think it’s a good initiative by Oxford to include “Indian -English” words, and I’m looking forward to see them in your writings.

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  3. Your poem is beautiful. I love that last line. It’s amazing that you don’t really know what inspires your poems. Whatever it is, it is wonderful.

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  4. I loved this poem and its rhythm. (I have to admit I found the line breaks a bit disconcerting. I kept wanting to put them together … a ghazal in a dabba!)

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  5. My goodness this is beautiful! 💝 I especially love; “even the difference is like a poem that means something else in the moonlight, a ghazal that reveals layer after layer with each reading.” Wow!

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  6. “Tell me your god is a poet. And not because the
    universe has been crafted as a perfect sonnet. ”

    OMG! i could just eats those lines with an ice cream spoon

    Happy Sunday Rajani

    much love…

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  7. Having studied linguistics, I’m interested in neologisms. We have borrowed so many lovely words from the Indian language, and I hope, as you do, to read them in poetry (with footnote translations to help me understand, of course!). I’m glad words are breaking through the fog, Rajani. I love this poem: the universe crafted as a perfect sonnet, love as an ode ‘scribbled on a brown / paper bag on a bus that’s always going away’, and the ‘strange foreign word that kisses your ear’. And that’s a great ending!

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    1. It is lovely, isn’t it, to find a new word which somehow changes the light and texture of the poem! And my writing has received a boost from reading your book, so I’ve given flash fiction a shot as well! Posted a piece this morning! Thanks so much!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. “Don’t we know ‘god’ is just a blessed pseudonym?” I like that, and no “just” about it! Why not a poet? One who hopes we find delight in creation, who undresses again, layer after layer. Even for the reasons your speaker says are not the reasons. Honestly, the universe makes so much more sense if we see that God is more than one poet–and more than a name.

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    1. Thank you, Susan! There is a part of us that wants to know more about what we don’t and in the process we keep on trying to make sense of it with the tools we have. Mostly we fail.

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