Micropoetry Month: Nov 2017: #12

Micropoetry MonthHaibun is a wonderful style because lets you combine prose and poetry in a beautifully fluid way. Basho, the master, wrote it in such a simple, effortless style making his work timeless.
I have two rules for myself. 1. Keep the prose short. 2. The haiku should derive from the prose without being repetitive in word or content.

Write your own haibun or any other form of micropoetry and share using comments or good old Mister Linky!

It was the kind of morning that had all the answers – the square of anticipation, the differential of despondency, the coefficient of human failure. Hanging from the sky like a picture frame behind which we had once hidden the dark, its colours dissolving into sunshine streams, its birds flying in formation beyond its corners. It was the kind of morning that should dawn after a night like that. After you left, after I stayed, after I gathered the pieces, not knowing if they could ever be put back together again. The improbability of hope.

shrinking dusk
the lone raven steals
the last of the light

 

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69 thoughts on “Micropoetry Month: Nov 2017: #12

    1. Thanks Elizabeth… an editor to whom I submitted a few haibun was of the opinion that haibun prose had to be very specific.. but I think there’s room for a lot of experimentation. I like where you’ve taken it as a tool of self exploration.

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      1. As I understand it, a haibun is a travelogue, a description of a journey. I think the most important journey anyone takes is that one in exploration of self. I took a chance that others might understand, and am grateful that you did. And I have found over the years, that those who make arbitrary rules about how poetry must be written, are often the ones who are most afraid of that journey. You might like to take a look at a brief essay I wrote about that recently. You can find it at
        http://1sojournal.wordpress.com

        Elizabeth

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  1. So much of life is the improbability of hope; that need we have that things will turn out OK despite the negative feelings and events happening around you. Beautiful haibun.

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  2. This is soo beautiful! Especially like; “Hanging from the sky like a picture frame behind which we had once hidden the dark”๐Ÿ’ž

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  3. I am fascinated by how you catch the mood, theme of your writing, so that you give the haibun that crucial twist in the tiny leap from prose to haiku. I think that is so crucial. When I compared the opening sentence in your prose to the last sentence, it gives the first sentence an eerie shadow. Strong haiku, very, the use of the Raven giving much to ponder if one wants. The comment might sound a bit overblown, but the sentiments are true.

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  4. I saw in the comments a haibun mention as being a travelogue. I think that misses the mark somewhat. Yes, haibun work well as part of a series, which lends itself to movement. However, true travelogue and writing about landscape and nature is reserved for kikรดbun.

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  5. Aw, what a lovely haibun and your haiku is just stunning…so much emotion is felt in your journey here. The haibun has been my favourite form of writing for several years, I even use it in my personal journal. Basho’s journals are timeless…we can be there with him even if we have never visited Edo ๐Ÿ™‚ I think that is one quality of haibun…the reader can follow in your footsteps for that brief moment. You did this here so beautifully!

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