Last Trumpet

At Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie, a prompt for a traditional form of Korean poetry called Sijo. A Sijo has 3 lines of 14-16 syllables each with the final line introducing a counter-theme/ twist to the poem. The Sijo doesn’t rhyme and has no title. Also you can get more specific and count syllable breaks for each line:  3-4-4-4/ 3-4-4-4/3-5-4-3.

high up in the blue mountains, it’s where the last great tusker roams,
hiding from the vile poachers, looking out for the cable snares;
still she strums her silent guitar, heart singing with the trumpets.

First shot at a Sijo. How many rules did I break???  And what if it were written like this:
high up in the blue mountains,
it’s where the last great tusker roams,
hiding from the vile poachers,
looking out for the cable snares;
still she strums her silent guitar,
heart singing with the trumpets.

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12 thoughts on “Last Trumpet

  1. This is great 🙂
    I think in English we’re more used to seeing formatting like the second example – but both of them fit the model wonderfully. The guitar was a great example of that unexpected twist. I really like what you’ve done here 🙂

    How sad to think of the last elephant .. In hiding…

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Very glad you had fun with it! I’ve been hoping to introduce forms from different cultures – but sometimes the rules don’t carry well into the English language. This one was complicated but manageable, you know?

        And I agree with you. People wait until it’s too late to get serious. I can’t imagine a world without elephants and tigers — can you???? A terrible thought.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. This Sijo was quite the challenge wasn’t it? I think you really rose to it! Love your twist (that was the hardest part for me to really grasp on how to accomplish successfully) and your end result is moving. I love elephants and think this is beautiful in either form you have shared with us 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

        1. Absolutely… I often find I can’t express certain cultural sensibilities in English and wish I could write in Hindi or Tamil.! I’ve read Ahmed Faraz and Faiz.. don’t know if the translations do them justice.

          Liked by 1 person

  3. It’s a charged debate: whether translations can ever do justice.

    Faiz is potent. He is the first Urdu poet to successfully transform romance to revolution of the downtrodden(Iqbal is fiery too but lamented too much about loss of a glorious past to care for the masses, I feel).

    I attempted some ‘interpreations’ of Faiz a few years ago on my blog, hopefully not too dreadful 🙂

    Like

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